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Home > Brief > Brief (2-2-2011)  Print

Vol. XLI No. 4; February 2, 2011
Editor: Adam Overland, brief@umn.edu

Inside This Issue
--Features: Profile of Kenneth Kozak, McKnight Land-Grant Professor; Cooking to fight obesity; Toward a test for lupus; U of M Moment.
--People: VP Rosenstone has been named the chancellor of Minnesota State Colleges and Universities; and more.

University News and Events
Top News | University-wide | Crookston | Duluth | Morris | Rochester | Twin Cities

TOP NEWS:

FEATURE: Salamanders aren’t that common in Minnesota. But salamanders are so common in high-elevation forests that their total biomass often exceeds that of rodents and birds, according to researcher Ken Kozak. They’re such a critical link in food webs that anything affecting salamanders could have a cascading effect on mountain ecosystems. As an emerging international leader in the study of biological diversity and predicting the impact of climate change on organisms, Kozak was named a McKnight Land-Grant Professor for 2010–12. For more information, read a profile of Kenneth Kozak.

FEATURE: Jenny Breen has donned virtually every chef hat imaginable: restaurant owner, caterer, cooking instructor, mother, health advocate, and cookbook author. Through it all, she has promoted local, sustainable foods. And it's a notion at the heart of every lesson she brings to adults and kids alike, as an instructor for the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum and the U's College of Continuing Education. For more information, read Jenny Breen.

FEATURE: A young woman looks fine to her friends, even though she's in great pain. Naturally, the friends find it hard to believe she has a life-threatening disease. Her situation typifies systemic lupus erythematosus, an autoimmune disease caused when the body's immune system attacks its own tissues. Researcher Emily Gillespie and her colleagues have found what may be chemical warning signs in the blood of lupus patients and have developed a test to detect them. For more information, read "Toward a test for lupus."

U OF M MOMENT: For some people, the Upper Midwest’s brutal winters can lead to feelings of gloominess, mood changes, and overall sluggishness. These feelings are common symptoms of a mild form of depression called Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, says Charles Schulz, head of the U's Department of Psychiatry. Schulz has some helpful advice for those suffering from SAD. For more information, listen to the U of M Moment.

Awards and appointments

PEOPLE: Vice President Steven Rosenstone has been named the next chancellor of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system; U in the News features U faculty cited in the media. Read about these topics and more in People.

CAMPUS ANNOUNCEMENTS AND EVENTS

UNIVERSITY-WIDE:

Administrative information

"BECAUSE" STANDARDS RELEASED. The U's Driven to Discover Because campaign has released standards for colleges and units to use in adopting the campaign, including graphics, guidelines, and helpful examples that show how to capture the inspirational and forward-thinking tone of Because. The campaign is a chance to think big and be creative about the magnificent possibilities of your unit, students, faculty, and staff. 3D Because models for use in promotions are available for loan at no cost. For more information, see the Because standards site.

UPDATE YOUR WIRELESS CONFIGURATION TO AVOID INTERRUPTION. This applies to UMTC, UMR, and some extension sites. Those who use the U of M Secure wireless network on the Twin Cities campus will need to make a slight configuration change to continue connecting to the network. In February, OIT engineers are installing a new security certificate, used to authenticate the network, "wireless.netaccess.umn.edu." This means users must change their computer configuration settings to "trust" the "AddTrust External CA Root" certificate authority. After February, users may remove trust configurations for the previously used "Thawte Premium Server CA" certificate authority. For help configuring your computer, see wireless setup guides. For help, call 1-HELP, or see OIT support.

REGISTRATION IS OPEN FOR ONLINE TRAINING IN GLOBAL HEALTH. Courses have been designed for local, national, and international health care providers who serve globally mobile populations such as immigrants, refugees, and/or travelers. Health care providers may register for any number of course modules. The Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility is offering the material to serve practicing health care providers who serve refugee and immigrant populations throughout the Twin Cities, in rural Minnesota and surrounding states, and internationally. For more information, see global health registration.

Funding opportunities

REMINDER: CALL FOR PROPOSALS: The Consortium on Law and Values in Health, Environment & the Life Sciences is issuing a call for proposals addressing the societal implications of problems in health, environment, or the life sciences. Awards are available in two categories: for graduate/professional students, University-wide; and for consortium/joint-degree program members. Proposals are due Feb. 7. For more information, email proposals, call 612-626-5624, or see societal implications.

IREE RENEWABLE ENERGY GRANTS: The Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment (IREE) is offering $4 million in funding for innovative projects that create the potential for technology breakthroughs in renewable energy while maximizing benefits to the environment. Funding is available to researchers for large grants (up to three years and $750,000 each), early career grants (up to three years and $150,000 each), and seed grants (one to two years and up to $70,000 each). Proposals will be accepted until March 29. For more information, see IREE Funding.

Lectures, exhibits, and other events

THE FRONTIERS IN THE ENVIRONMENT LECTURE SERIES, a program of the Institute on the Environment (IonE), kicks off its spring 2011 programming on Feb. 2, with "Bringing the New Green Economy to Scale." Join IonE each Wednesday for a presentation and Q&A session, followed by a casual get-together in the IonE Commons. Upcoming lectures include "The War of Words About Science," Feb. 9; "Oil: Can’t America Just Get Over It?", Feb. 16; and more. The lectures also air live online via UMConnect. For more information, see frontiers lecture series.

REMINDER: THE 2011 QUALITY FAIR & FORUM is Feb. 3, 8:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m., Carlson School of Management. For more information, see Quality Fair 2011.

THE U WILL HOLD ITS BROWN BAG FINANCIAL SERIES from noon to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays in February. Upcoming sessions include "Remaining Confident in a Volatile Market," Feb. 9; "A Perspective on Today's Economy," Feb. 16; and "Investment Perspectives Webinar," Feb. 23. The first two events will be held at 210 Donhowe or online through UMConnect. The third session will be a live webinar broadcast directly from the corporate offices of Vanguard Funds in Philadelphia. Registration is required for session #3. For registration and more information, or to participate online, see Brown Bag finance.

GLOBAL SPOTLIGHT THEMES: The Global Programs and Strategy Alliance (GPS Alliance, formerly the Office of International Programs) Global Spotlight 2010–12 focuses on Latin America and the Caribbean and the pressing global impact of urbanization. Through the GPS Alliance, Global Spotlight cosponsors symposia, conferences, and cultural events through its small grants program to inform the U and local communities about the U's work in these areas. Global Spotlight also supports faculty and graduate student research and scholarly initiatives related to the themes. John Romano, assistant vice president for international scholarship, heads up the initiative. For more information, see Global Spotlight.

CROOKSTON:

UMC AND NORTHWEST SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE ARIZONA SOCIAL will take place Feb. 18 in Mesa, AZ. Alumni and current or retired faculty and staff are invited to join in the annual event. RSVP to Sue Dwyer or call 218-281-8401.

DON CAVALIER, director of Career and Counseling Services, has been named the district governor for Rotary International District 5580 in 2012–13. Cavalier has been with UMC for the past 35 years. For more information, see Rotary.

RECENT GIFTS TO UMC include a $10,000 gift in support of students involved in North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture (NACTA) for their upcoming spring trip to the NACTA National Judging Competition conference in Modesto, CA; a $5,000 gift in support of the Women's Volleyball and Soccer Locker Room Fund; and a $50,000 gift from Altru Health System supporting the Altru Scholarship Fund and equipment needs in the Math, Science, and Technology Department.

DULUTH:

UMD ALUMNI ASSOCIATION WILL HOLD A "BREAK THE ICE" EVENT Feb. 5, 5:30 p.m., Duluth Entertainment and Convention Center, AMSOIL Arena. A pre-game supper buffet hosted by the UMD Alumni Association will be followed by men's hockey—UMD Bulldogs versus UMTC Gophers. All alumni are invited. For ticket information, call the UMD Alumni office at 218-726-7164 or 1-866-726-7164.

UMD ART AND DESIGN WILL PRESENT A VISUAL LECTURE SERIES with Dan Goods, visual strategist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Goods's aim is to give people experiences where they interact with something beautiful, meaningful, and/or possibly profound. Feb. 8, 6 p.m., 70 Montague Hall. Free and open to the public. For more information, see visual lecture or call 218-726-8225.

PROFESSOR JOHN GOODGE of UMD's Department of Geological Sciences returned from his 11th Antarctic expedition in the Transantarctic Mountains. Covering 932 miles, Goodge and his team collected 28 boxes of rocks for laboratory study. While on the expedition, Goodge blogged for the New York Times.

A UMD THEATRE PRODUCTION WAS SELECTED BY THE KENNEDY CENTER AMERICAN COLLEGE THEATRE FESTIVAL (KCACTF) for participation in its Region V Festival. The production, Shakespeare's Richard III, directed by Professor Tom Isbell, was one of five plays in a six-state region chosen for the festival. For more information, see theatre festival.

UMD HISTORIC GLENSHEEN ESTATE WINTER HOURS: 9:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m., weekends only. Tours begin at 10 a.m., with the last beginning at 3 p.m. Weekday tours are available upon request. For more information, see Glensheen.

MORRIS:

THE FIFTH ANNUAL COMMUNITY OF SCHOLARS EVENT will welcome approximately 200 students and their families to campus Feb. 4–5. The students will be competing for the Prairie Scholars Award and the Morris Scholars Award. For more information, see Community of Scholars.

THE MORRIS HEALTHY EATING INITIATIVE is launching a campaign to increase access to and consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables—especially those locally grown—to improve the health of students and the region’s population as a whole. The project researched the local food environment to determine barriers and assets to improving healthy eating. Findings are detailed in a 95-page report, available to the public. For more information, see healthy eating.

A SECOND WIND TURBINE IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION AT UMM. The new structure will stand 1,600 feet south of the West Central Research and Outreach Center turbine on city land. With the addition of a second turbine, wind energy should provide an average of 70 percent of campus electricity, with 100 percent possible. For more information, see wind turbine.

ROCHESTER:

ELECTIONS WERE HELD RECENTLY FOR THE ROCHESTER STUDENT ASSOCIATION. The results of the elections are available online.

TWIN CITIES:

Administrative information

A TEST OF TXT-U, THE U'S EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION TEXT MESSAGING SYSTEM for sending critical campus safety information to faculty, staff, and students, will occur Feb. 2, 1 p.m., to coincide with state emergency testing. TXT-U is used infrequently and only for real emergency situations or semester tests. For more information, see Emergency Preparedness and register for TXT-U by campus.

TECHNOLOGY TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES FOR SPRING 2011 are available, free, through the Office of Information Technology. For more information and a complete listing of courses, see technology training.

CONSERVATION MADNESS. UMTC residence halls will take part in an energy conservation competition, with the winning hall receiving a college basketball national championship tailgate party. The Office of Housing & Residential Life has teamed up with Facilities Management to create the competition. The hall that reduces its electricity use and waste by the largest percentage and recycles the most from Feb. 7-20 will win a tailgate party on Apr. 4, featuring pizza, refreshments, and door prizes. For more information, see conservation competition.

THE OFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (OIT) TECHNOLOGY FAIR will feature the latest technology products and services from vendor partners. Learn more about OIT services, enjoy refreshments, and enter a prize drawing. Feb. 17, 10 a.m.–1 p.m., Mississippi room, Coffman Union. For more information, see OIT technology fair.

MINNEAPOLIS PASSPORT AGENCY is hosting "No Friend Left Behind Day 2011." For one day only, no appointment or proof of travel is needed when applying for a passport. Feb. 8, 8 a.m.–2 p.m. For more information, download the flyer.

Lectures, exhibits, and other events

"MIGRATION AND CHINA'S URBAN TRANSFORMATION," the 10th annual Bob and Kim Griffin "Building U.S.-China Bridges Lecture," will be given by Weiping Wu, professor of urban and environmental policy and planning at Tufts University. Following the lecture will be a reception and celebration of the Chinese New Year. The lecture is sponsored by the China Center. Feb. 9, 4:30 p.m., Great Hall, Coffman Union. Free and open to the public. For more information, see lecture.

U OF M PHYSICS CIRCUS: Physics Force will present "Physics Circus," a unique mix of physics demonstrations and slapstick humor suitable for adults and children of all ages. Each year the show brings large-scale stunts and physics lessons to more than 20,000 school-age kids. The show is free, but there is a fee for Convention Center parking. Feb. 10, 7–8:30 p.m., Minneapolis Convention Center. For more information, see Physics Circus.

REGISTRATION IS OPEN FOR MINI MEDICAL SCHOOL. This winter, Mini Medical School focuses on regenerative medicine. Mondays, Feb. 14–March 14, 6–8:30 p.m., 2-650 Moos Tower. U faculty, staff, students, and others may receive a discounted rate of $65 for the entire series. For registration and more information, see Mini Medical School or call 612-626-7072.

THE INAUGURAL CANCER DISPARITIES GRAND ROUNDS will take place Feb. 15. Mayo Clinic professor of oncology Judith Kaur will present "Walking the Talk of Cancer Control: Community-based Participatory Research in Action," noon–1 p.m., 450 Masonic Research Building. Kaur is the medical director for the Native American Programs of the Mayo Comprehensive Cancer Center. Her research also includes a special interest in women's cancers, particularly breast and cervical cancer. For more information, see Grand Rounds.

FRIENDS OF EASTCLIFF BOOK CLUB, a sharing of literature and ideas at the historic home of the U's president and family, will next feature Gayla Marty, director of communications for the Graduate School, discussing her memoir, Memories of Trees, Feb. 17. The book club provides an opportunity for faculty, staff, alumni, and the community to participate in showcasing U of M authors. The club requires an annual membership fee. For more information, see Friends of Eastcliff.

INTERNATIONALIZATION CONFERENCE: Registration is open for the second annual Internationalizing the Curriculum and Campus Conference. Organized by the Global Programs and Strategy Alliance, the conference will be held March 25, 9 a.m.–5 p.m., 3M Auditorium, Carlson School. For registration and more information, see the conference website.

THE CENTER FOR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE and the Department of Recreational Sports have developed cross-country ski trails at the UMTC golf course, located off Larpenteur and Cleveland Avenues (near the St. Paul Campus). For more information, see ski trails.

DEALS AND DISCOUNTS at the Student Unions & Activities Information Desks include tickets for the Feb. 9 and Feb. 15 Minnesota Wild games. On Feb. 14 at Goldy's Gameroom, buy one game of bowling using Gopher GOLD value and get a free game, as well as a chance to win $50 in Gopher GOLD. For more information, see discounts, and Goldy's Gameroom.

MORE EVENTS include The Voronezh State Ballet Theatre of Russia (Feb. 3); Out of Bounds: Challenging the Status Quo (Feb. 4); Literacy and Rhetorical Studies Spring Mixer (Feb. 7). SEE THESE AND MORE TWIN CITIES CAMPUS EVENTS.

UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS: Golden Gophers | UMD Bulldogs | UMM Cougars | UMC Golden Eagles

For additional news, information, and resources about U faculty and staff, visit the Faculty and Staff website. Follow us on Twitter at UFacultyStaff.


Brief is the official University of Minnesota staff and faculty weekly news digest, featuring human resource, employee benefit, administrative, legislative, budgetary, event, and other pertinent information.

Published by Internal Communications in the Office of University Relations at the University of Minnesota. Please send comments, questions, or submissions to the editor at brief@umn.edu. The deadline for submissions is noon on the Friday before publication. All Twin Cities event submissions are handled through the events calendar at http://events.tc.umn.edu.

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