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Academics

Academics and Activities

Throughout their academic career, students should try to combine their studies with out-of-classroom experiences. Numerous opportunities are available—see Tips for student success from a past issue of the Parent Newsletter, and read about one student's experience with a service-learning class that combines coursework with community volunteering.

The Orientation and First-Year Programs website links students with opportunities to find balance in their academic, co-curricular, and social life—all the way through graduation. The site features current and upcoming events for first-year students, first-year stories, advice from current students, ways to get involved, and more.

The University of Minnesota defines academic freedom as the "freedom, without institutional discipline or restraint, to discuss all relevant matters in the classroom, to explore all avenues of scholarship, research, and creative expression, and to speak or write on matters of public concern as well as on matters related to professional duties and the functioning of the University.

Planning for Graduation

From how to graduate in four years to the graduation ceremony to University traditions and more.

See graduation >

Campus Calendars

Links to University calendars related to tuition billing dates, finals, academic year, sports, and more.

See the calendars >

School Records

Getting access to your student's records

The University is prohibited from releasing certain information to parents without permission of the student (see FERPA below). However, students can grant access to their parents or guest access in order to share information or pay their bills.

See Paying Bills and Student Record Access for more information.

Your student will need to fill out the parent/guest access form on the One Stop website before you can access their records.

If your access has been granted, use this quick link to guest access.

FERPA—Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) also known as the Buckley Amendment, considers college students as responsible adults who are allowed to determine who will receive information about them. Under this law, parents who want to receive a copy of their student’s academic or financial records can do so if their student signs a release form.

Find out more about FERPA >

Study Abroad

The Learning Abroad Center can help students select and prepare for a summer, semester, or year-long study abroad experience. Parents can find out more about study abroad including locations available, the various types of programs, expenses and scholarships, and other valuable information from the Learning Abroad Center.

Study Abroad Workshop for Parents gives parents an introduction to international study and how it fits with their student's academic program. The program includes information on financial aid for study abroad, strategies parents can use to support their student's international study, and the perspective of students and parents on how study abroad impacts students.

The following articles focus on study abroad:
Parents can help make study abroad successful
When students go abroad, should parents visit?

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Academic FAQs

Answers to academic-related questions including honor societies, the Dean’s list, poor academic performance, proof of enrollment, graduation, books, and more.

See the Academic FAQs >

Computing FAQs

Parents often have questions about technology, so the Parent Program has worked with 1-HELP and One Stop staff to address some of the most commonly asked questions.

Articles of Interest

The second year

Preparing for life—and jobs—outside the classroom

Students benefit from off-campus programs

Access to student information

Find a path through complexity

Knowing when to seek help
Q: My son is having trouble taking timed tests in his math class. He knows how to do the problems, so he doesn't need tutoring. He just can't figure out the answers fast enough. What can he do?

Time management
Q: My son is a freshman, and he's living at home. The first semester, he seemed unconcerned about his classes, then he began panicking in mid-October. In November, he dropped his math class because he felt he was way behind and didn't think he could catch up. He's also working 15 hours a week at a computer store near home. Sometimes I think his job is a higher priority for him than homework. How can he learn to manage his time better this semester?

Senior paper
Q: My son was due to graduate this spring, but now he says he won't have his senior paper done. He has been stressed over this paper all year, and he seems to think that he just can't get it right. Is there somewhere he can get help with this?