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Teaching Enrichment Videos

In August of 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013, the Center for Teaching and Learning offered a series of workshops designed to address a range of instructional experiences and goals. Several of the workshops are available as video presentations.

CTL will again host the August Teaching Enrichment Series in August 2014. All members of the University teaching community are welcome.

Workshops
Active Learning: Matching Teaching to Learning Goals
Engaging the International Students in Our Classes
Learning in Groups
Learning in Large Classes: What you can do with 50 students that you can’t do with 15
The Literature on Good Teaching: Why Should You Care?
Making the Grade(s)
Planning for and Evaluating Student Presentations
Sticky Teaching: 6 Principles for Developing Memorable Presentations
Stress and Learning: How Brain Research Can Support Your Teaching
Student Mental Health: The Role of Faculty and Staff
Incorporating Universal Design Principles in the Development, Delivery, and Assessment of Your Instruction
 

 

Description Video Accompanying materials

Incorporating Universal Design Principles in the Development, Delivery, and Assessment of Your Instruction

Universal Design for Instruction is an approach to teaching that mindfully employs inclusive practices that will benefit a broad range of learners by enhancing instruction without compromising academic standards. You will gain concrete instructional strategies you can use immediately to promote more learning for more students, and increase your satisfaction as an instructor.

Universal thumbnail Handout for Universal Design Principles

Learning in Groups

This workshop includes discussion of the challenges of group work and suggestions for how to address those challenges. Learn about group work models and consider ways the models may be relevant to your own class context. Reflect on your own expectations for group work and gather practical tips for successful group work.

LearnInGroups thumbnail Handout for Universal Design Principles

Learning in Large Classes: What you can do with 50 students that you can’t do with 15

In the current economic situation, many of us may have more opportunities to teach larger classes. Instead of viewing the large class as a problem, why not view it as an opportunity to create a better learning environment? A larger class offers more chances for diverse opinions, a greater capacity for extended dialogue, and the opportunity to create unique active learning environments only possible with many students. We discuss and demonstrate the benefits for both students and instructors of teaching to a large group and provide strategies for taking advantage of those benefits. Gain practical ideas and a plan for implementing those ideas in your own teaching.

largeClasses thumbnail Handout for Learning in Large Classes

Making the Grade(s)

If you find grading to be your least favorite part of teaching this workshop is for you. We discuss thorny philosophical issues (curve vs. criterion, inflation vs. increase) and offer practical strategies for creating grading systems that are fair, efficient and helpful to learners.

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Sticky Teaching: 6 Principles for Developing Memorable Presentations

Every teacher knows that students rapidly forget large amounts of information provided in their classes during the semester. How can one create “sticky” teaching messages that will be both memorable and useful to students? We adapt six principles from the book Made to Stick (Heath & Heath, 2008) to a teaching and learning environment through a host of relevant examples and problems. Instructors can make repeated use of these principles to guide and conduct their classes in any discipline.

StickyTeaching thumbnail Handout for Sticky Teaching

Student Mental Health: The Role of Faculty and Staff

Students with conditions impacting their mental health are entering colleges and universities in unprecedented numbers. We highlight the state of mental health issues on campus, the valuable role that faculty and staff play in a broad public health approach to mental health, and the existing campus resources that support faculty and staff in responding to students. Find out about the resources available at www.mentalhealth.umn.edu. Gain a clear understanding of your role in responding to students in distress and basic tools for approaching; assessing and referring distressed students to campus mental health resources.

mentalhealth thumbnail Handout for Student Mental Health

Planning for and Evaluating Student Presentations

Whether you are new to student presentations or just looking for tips to improve their quality, this workshop provides a look at this often used assignment. Workshop topics include strategies for ensuring that groups function well and produce good work, methods for grading group and individual presentations, and techniques for making presentations a learning experience for your students rather than something to dread.

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Active Learning: Matching Teaching to Learning Goals

Many instructors understand the benefits of active learning, but may have questions about how to select and implement teaching methods appropriate to their course goals. What are the options beyond "think-pair-share" and "small group discussion?" What choices best promote critical thinking? Don't require enormous set up time? This workshop presents and models a variety of lesser known but effective active learning techniques such as jigsaws, notes exchange, concept mapping, and case-based learning. Participants also discuss a framework to connect these teaching strategies to desired learning.

Click here to watch the Active Learning: Matching Teaching to Learning Goals video Handout for Active Learning: Matching Teaching to Learning Goals

The Literature on Good Teaching: Why Should You Care?

Most of us will consult the published literature to inform our scholarly pursuits, but what about our teaching? If you have never consulted published teaching research, or if you are skeptical about the quality of published teaching research, this workshop will provide you with some tools to begin leveraging the literature to energize your teaching. We introduce the concept of evidence-based pedagogy and provide an introduction to navigating the teaching literature. We also provide a framework for evaluating the quality of teaching literature and suggest ways to incorporate the teaching literature into your own teaching practice. You will acquire principles applicable to both face-to-face and online teaching environments.

Click here to watch the The Literature on Good Teaching: Why Should You Care video Handout for The Literature on Good Teaching: Why Should You Care

Engaging the International Students in Our Classes

The number of international undergraduate students at the U is steadily increasing. We first present data on how these students experience educational differences between their home countries and here. We then examine instructional strategies that facilitate their transition while benefiting all students in the course. Our discussion emphasizes approaches that bring out the unique perspectives of international students in course-appropriate ways.

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Stress and Learning: How Brain Research Can Support Your Teaching

It can be more difficult to learn in highly stressful situations, but does that mean as teachers we should strive to eliminate stress from our classroom? We discuss the effects of stress on the brain and how this may impact student learning. Using published literature from the fields of brain research and education as our foundation, we explore the idea that some stress may actually be beneficial to the learning process. We offer strategies for reducing boredom for your students by creating a classroom environment that is stimulating without being overwhelming. Principles discussed in this workshop are applicable to both face-to-face and online teaching environments.

Click here to watch the Stress and Learning: How Brain Research Can Support Your Teaching video Handout for Stress and Learning: How Brain Research Can Support Your Teaching