University of Minnesota
Office of Human Resources
http://www.umn.edu/ohr
612-625-2016

August 2013 Teaching Enrichment Series

The 2013 August Teaching Enrichment Series (ATES) was held on Tuesday, August 27, and Wednesday, August 28. Concurrent workshops were held each day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

On Thursday, August 29, we offered individual consultations.

Register for an individual consultation.

 

2013 August Teaching Enrichment Series schedule (pdf)


Tuesday, August 27


9 AM

Distracting, Disruptive, Disturbed: Strategies for Managing Difficult Classroom Behaviors

Presenter: Matt Hanson, University Counseling and Career Services
Keller Hall Room 3-111


New T.A. Orientation

Presenter: Paul Ching, Center for Teaching and Learning
Bell Museum Auditorium

The New TA Orientation this year will consist of face-to-face workshops and an online training component.

The online component, which will be ready by mid-August, introduces new TAs to policies and procedures that are likely to affect them in their roles as students and teachers at the University of Minnesota. The topics covered include academic misconduct, classroom harassment and working with students with disabilities.

The face to face component will take place on Tuesday, August 27th, from 9-11AM, and will involve an interactive theater presentation about teaching and learning, and activities designed to help participants set the right tone and expectations on that all important first day of class.

 



10 AM

Teaching Non-Majors in Large-Enrollment Courses: An Instructor's Guide to Engaging a Diverse and Multidisciplinary Audience

Presenters: Jay Hatch, Leon Hsu, College of Education and Human Development; Kent Kirkby, Kenneth Leopold, College of Science and Engineering
Keller Hall Room 3-111

Large-enrollment courses for non-majors, such as liberal education/theme requirements or service courses for related majors, are a significant part of many departments' teaching activities. However, teaching such courses presents distinctive challenges, including helping students to become acquainted with a field's disciplinary norms and ways of thinking, engaging students in subject material outside of their own majors, and helping students to see the relevance of the course to their other studies and their personal lives. In part 1 of this workshop, we offer some frameworks for thinking about how to structure such courses and in part 2, we consider some strategies for teaching them.



11 AM

Teaching Non-Majors in Large-Enrollment Courses: An Instructor's Guide to Engaging a Diverse and Multidisciplinary Audience

Presenters: Jay Hatch, Leon Hsu, College of Education and Human Development; Kent Kirkby, Kenneth Leopold, College of Science and Engineering
Keller Hall Room 3-111

Large-enrollment courses for non-majors, such as liberal education/theme requirements or service courses for related majors, are a significant part of many departments' teaching activities. However, teaching such courses presents distinctive challenges, including helping students to become acquainted with a field's disciplinary norms and ways of thinking, engaging students in subject material outside of their own majors, and helping students to see the relevance of the course to their other studies and their personal lives. In part 1 of this workshop, we offer some frameworks for thinking about how to structure such courses and in part 2, we consider some strategies for teaching them.

  


Active Learning 101: A Whirlwind Tour

Presenter: Barbara Beers, Center for Teaching and Learning
Keller Hall Room 3-115

This workshop is for those who are new to teaching, new to teaching in the US, or who are new to using active learning strategies. The participants will experience some basic active learning techniques, from the basic Think/Pair/Share to the Jigsaw Teamwork reading technique.


12 noon

The Sticky* Syllabus: Creating Course Guides to Motivate Your Students

Presenter: Christina Petersen, Center for Teaching and Learning.
Keller Hall Room 3-111

Does your syllabus motivate your students or is it merely a text-heavy, detail- laden document that they rarely read? We apply the sticky* principles for creating memorable messages to the design of the course syllabus. In this session we will present ideas to transform your syllabus into an attractive document that inspires and energizes students, yet still provides essential information they will need to do well in your course. You are encouraged to bring your own syllabus with you to this workshop.

*Based on the book Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath (2008)


Putting Students at the Helm: Designing Strategies to Keep Groups--and their Projects--on Course

Presenters: Kate Martin, Center for Teaching and Learning and Virajita Singh, College of Design
Keller Hall Room 3-115

Group work and team projects can be rife with complications and conflicts. Minimize these by designing into your group assignments strategic activities that focus students on the process, as well as the product. Please bring a group assignment to discuss and modify during the workshop.


Wednesday, August 28


9 AM

Teaching Critical Thinking

Presenter: Anita Gonzalez, Center for Teaching and Learning
Keller Hall Room 3-111

Students from all disciplines are asked to “think critically” about their subjects, but do they know what instructors are seeking? Although critical thinking is highly regarded in academia and the workplace, how do instructors design learning activities and assess this elusive goal? In this workshop, participants will define critical thinking within the context of their respective disciplines, map learning activities that cultivate critical thinking, and consider methods to assess critical thinking. Participants should come to this workshop with a syllabus for a course they are or will be teaching (or an outline or an idea for such a course).


Why Don't They Speak Up? Including the Introverts

Presenters: Colleen Meyers and Caroline Rosen, Center for Teaching and Learning
Keller Hall Room 3-115

Have you ever wanted to make the playing field equal between your introverted and extroverted students during classroom activities? Do you wish the quiet students would express their ideas more? This session will address the ways in which teachers can structure the classroom climate to maximize participation for all students. Learn what to do and what not to do when working with reserved students. The session is open to anyone interested in understanding more about how personality preference interacts with classroom dynamics.


Engaging International Students in the Classroom

Presenters: Jeff Lindgren, Center for Teaching and Learning, Tasoulla Hadjiyanni, College of Design, and Mary Katherine O’Brien, Global Programs and Strategy Alliance
Keller Hall Room 3-125

The number of undergraduate international students studying at the University of Minnesota has increased in recent years. An exciting change, it also brings to the surface additional questions. This presentation begins to address some of these questions: What are the challenges that international students face in the classroom, including differences in classroom culture? How can instructors encourage interactions between all students? How can the classroom experience be enriched by the presence of international students? What additional challenges may instructors face, and how could those challenges be overcome? By sharing examples from their own experiences, the presenters aim to start a dialogue that can help participants chart ways by which the diversity in the student body is celebrated and supported.



10 AM

The Flipped Classroom

Presenters: Bill Rozaitis, Center for Teaching and Learning; Michelle Driessen, College of Science and Engineering
Keller Hall Room 3-111

Have you heard the term “flipped classroom” and wondered what this practice is and how it might relate to your own teaching? This workshop explores the concept of the flipped classroom and considers the promises and challenges posed by the practice. Participants will be introduced to examples of flipped courses, will consider how (and whether) the flipped classroom approach will work in their own teaching context, and will receive information to help them begin planning for “the flip.”


Grading Rubrics: Efficient and Effective Tools for Measuring Student Learning

Presenter: David Langley, Center for Teaching and Learning
Keller Hall Room 3-115

A rubric is a scoring guide for evaluating student or group performance. Rubrics are widely used in many disciplines because they provide informative feedback to students, reduce the time spent on grading, and use a common framework for analyzing student work. Despite these advantages, it is common to find poorly constructed rubrics that end up causing more work for instructors during grading. This session presents a set of rules to recognize and design a quality rubric format for your course. Participants will be able to build a high quality, defensible rubric that will reduce grading time and help students produce better work products for their graded assignments.


Teaching Through Active Lectures

Presenter: Paul Ching, Center for Teaching and Learning
Keller Hall Room 3-125

While the lecture is the most common method used to teach adults (Bligh, 2000), it is also largely ineffective as a form of teaching (Wieman, 2007). In addition, given that the fear of public speaking is second only to the fear of snakes (Gallup, 2001), what can instructors do if they have to teach a lecture class? This workshop will provide you with methods and strategies to engage your students, make your lectures memorable and alleviate the performance anxiety that you might feel when you give your lecture.


11 AM

Sparking Effective Peer-to-Peer Feedback

Presenter: Ilene Alexander, Center for Teaching and Learning
Keller Hall Room 3-111

To guide our students in providing astute and creative feedback to images, words, performances or screencasts being created by peers, we teachers need to develop peer feedback processes and practices that call students to “Read and Respond like a Real Reader.” These 4Rs will underscore this workshop as we discuss ways of developing peer-response protocols as part of a “feed forward” learning strategy.


Discussions that Engage All Students

Presenters: Deb Wingert and Colleen Meyers, Center for Teaching and Learning
Keller Hall Room 3-115

Are you concerned about discussions that get out of control? Students that talk too much or too little? Discussions that take too much of your class time? Join us for this highly-interactive session to expand your repertoire of basic discussion tips, strategies, and tools guaranteed to actively engage students representing diverse background and knowledge levels in your class. This workshop is designed for faculty, staff, and TAs who instruct undergraduate and graduate students from any discipline in any instructional setting (lab, recitation, clinic, seminar, large class, or small class).


The Digital Idea Stream: 5 Technologies for Teaching, Learning and Research

Presenters: Cristina Lopez, Lauren Marsh, Susan Tade, Kim Wilcox, Educational Technology Services, OIT
Keller Hall Room 3-125

New learning technologies are emerging all the time, and it’s difficult to keep up with the wealth of new opportunities these tools afford us. We will introduce to you a mix of centrally-supported and generally available emerging technologies, and discuss ways to integrate them into the classroom.



12 noon

Plenary: Too Much Information: Maximizing Student Learning While Minimizing Cognitive Load

Presenters: Kris Gorman and David Langley, Center for Teaching and Learning
Akerman Hall Room 209

Have you noticed that students routinely start getting distracted midway through class? Do students have trouble remembering things you already taught them? In this session, we'll discuss the known limitations on human memory and attention, and how you can enhance your teaching without overloading students' cognitive abilities.