University of Minnesota
Office of Human Resources
http://www.umn.edu/ohr
612-625-2016

Welcome to the Center for Teaching and Learning’s online workshop, Internationalizing by Design. This workshop will help you integrate global perspectives into either a new undergraduate class that you intend to teach or one that you have already taught.

Navigating this Workshop

Using the menu, we invite you to select your own path through the workshop; that is, you may enter it at any point. However, we encourage you to begin with the first section, Definitions of Key Terms. As you move through this segment, you will become familiar with the definition of several key terms before you move onto the second section, Rationale for the Workshop.

The third section, Approaches to Course Design, describes a process called Backward Design.1 You will find that the segments within this section are sequenced to reflect movement through that process. If your primary purpose for taking this workshop is to design a new course or redesign an old one, you should be able to realize that goal by completing only this section.

The fourth section, Cultural Influences on Learning — Teaching and Course Design, presents theoretical frames upon which this workshop has been designed. The content provides foundational information and describes basic conceptual and curricular themes around which the workshop has been organized. This specific component has been designed to serve an ancillary function; that is, while providing you with background information that is relevant to the task of designing or redesigning an internationalized course, its completion is optional.

The fifth section, Sample Internationalized Syllabi, showcases several multi-disciplinary examples of internationalized courses designed by University of Minnesota faculty members who participated in a year-long development initiative, “Internationalizing On-Campus Courses (IOCC) between 2001 and 2004.2

It is hoped that as you move through this entire online tutorial or even just parts of it, you will not only become more proficient in terms of designing an internationalized course for undergraduate students, but also more aware of explicit and implicit aspects of your own cultural perspectives, assumptions, beliefs, and traditions.


Notes

  1. Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, Understanding by Design, Columbus, OH: Prentice Hall, 1998.
  2. The syllabus for this faculty development initiative can be found in this workshop list of resources.

Contact Us

If you have any comments or questions about this tutorial, please email us at teachlrn@umn.edu.