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Today's News: Friday, September 6, 2013

Research

Using human cells, U professor is building parts to repair the circulatory system
In a lab at the U, a persistent professor is using human cells to engineer arteries and heart valves. U of M professor Robert Tranquillo is profiled.
Star Tribune
http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/health/221953401.html

Gut bacteria from thin humans can slim down mice
The trillions of bacteria that live in the gut — helping digest foods, making some vitamins, making amino acids — may help determine if a person is fat or thin. Alexander Khoruts, U of M Medical School, weighs in.
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/06/health/gut-bacteria-from-thin-humans-can-slim-mice-down.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

People and Lifestyle

When health deductibles rise, men delay emergency care
Men, it turns out, are more likely to delay treatment for serious conditions under high-deductible plans, in contrast to women, who tend to be more selective and cut back care for minor ailments only. Katy Kozhimannil, U of M School of Public Health, comments.
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/06/your-money/when-health-deductibles-rise-men-delay-emergency-care.html?_r=0

The connection between sports and character
Mary Jo Kane, Director of the U of M's Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, comments on the connection between sports and character.
MPR
http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2013/09/06/daily-circuit-friday-roundtable

Game, sex and match
Sportswomen are beginning to score more commercial goals - but they still have a lot of ground to make up. Mary Jo Kane, a U of M sport sociologist, comments.
The Economist
http://www.economist.com/news/international/21585012-sportswomen-are-beginning-score-more-commercial-goalsbut-they-still-have-lot-ground

Antidepressants have no effect on bone loss
The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or tricyclic antidepressants among women in midlife didn't lead to a greater rate of bone loss, a prospective cohort study found. Susan Diem, U of M Medical School, comments.
MedPage Today
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Endocrinology/Osteoporosis/41406