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Media Advisory.

Media Advisory

U of M School of Music University Symphony Orchestra to premiere Swan Composer Prize winner Jonathan Kolm's "Prophecies" Dec. 9

Contacts: Lisa Marshall, School of Music, (612) 626-1094, marsh396@umn.edu
Ryan Maus, University News Service, (612) 624-1690, maus@umn.edu

November 25, 2009

The University of Minnesota School of Music recently announced that the winning work of the 2009 Craig and Janet Swan Composer Prize is "Prophecies" by Jonathan Kolm. This work will be premiered by the university’s Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Mark Russell Smith at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2009 in Ted Mann Concert Hall, 2128 4th Street S., Minneapolis.

Also featured on the program will be Joseph Schwantner’s New Morning for the World (“Daybreak of Freedom”) for speaker and orchestra with texts by Martin Luther King, Jr. (to be narrated by noted Minnesota sports physician Dr. Joel Boyd), as well as Beethoven’s Symphony no. 3 in E-Flat Major (Eroica).

Kolm, the Swan Composer Prizer winner, will attend dress rehearsals and the premiere performance. The $2,500 Swan Composer Prize will be awarded formally at the work’s premiere. Kolm’s works have been heard in the U.S. and abroad. He recently participated in the 2008 Vocal Essence/American Composers Forum workshop for new choral music. In 2007 the Young New Yorker’s Chorus premiered one of his commissioned works, and he won first place in the Austin Peay State Composition Competition. Crystal Fantasy, for violin, cello, flute and clarinet was performed at the Dallas Museum of Art where it won second place in the 2005 Voices of Change Composition Contest. His work for SATB chorus, Cedo Maiori, was premiered in October 2006 by the New York Virtuoso Singers at Columbia University.

Kolm holds degrees from Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Texas at Austin and currently serves as assistant professor of music at Grove City College in Pennsylvania. As winner of the Swan Commission, he will be in residence at the U of M School of Music from December 7 through 9 at the University of Minnesota School of Music.

Dr. Boyd, narrator of Schwanter’s New Morning for the World, is the team doctor for the Minnesota Vikings, Wild, Lynx and Swarm, and provides orthopaedic expertise when players sustain injuries during play. Dr. Boyd is also a United States Olympic Team Physician and has served the men’s and women’s hockey teams in Nagano, Japan in 1998, in addition to many United States World Championship hockey teams.

The Swan Composer Prize competition is an annual event and the emphasis rotates among choral, wind ensemble and orchestral works, created in response to the generosity, vision and abiding interest in music as a living art on the part of Craig and Janet Swan. The Swan Prize competition is open to composers in the earlier career stages currently residing in the United States; all entries remain anonymous throughout the entire two-tier adjudication process. The American Composers Forum and the University of Minnesota School of Music administered the competition.

The American Composers Forum is committed to supporting composers and developing new markets for their music. Through granting, commissioning, and performance programs, the Forum provides composers at all stages of their careers with valuable resources for professional and artistic development. By linking communities with composers and performers, the Forum fosters a demand for new music, enriches communities and helps develop the next generation of composers, musicians and music patrons.

Established in 1902, the University of Minnesota School of Music offers a dynamic, comprehensive program to more than 500 music students in undergraduate and graduate programs, led by a world-class faculty of over 50 artists, scholars and teachers. The School of Music presents more than 400 free concerts per year. For a complete schedule of events, visit www.music.umn.edu or call (612) 626-1094 for a brochure.

Tags: College of Liberal Arts

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