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Feature

The new McGuire Building

The McGuire Translational Research Facility on the corner of 5th Ave. and Oak St. on the Twin Cities campus.

McGuire Translational Research Facility celebrates grand opening

Published on June 14, 2005

Tuberculosis, HIV, malaria, heart disease, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury are among the dozens of health care challenges that researchers will study in the University of Minnesota's new McGuire Translational Research Facility, which had its official opening on Tuesday, June 14. Work in the McGuire Building will be devoted to "translational" research, which bridges the gap between basic science research and breakthrough therapies, moving new discoveries from the lab to patient care more quickly.

The building will house interdisciplinary researchers from the Stem Cell Institute, the College of Pharmacy's Orphan Drug Center, and the new Center for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology Translational Research.

"The University has always had the research talent, and now we have an innovative place for collaboration to improve the health of the people of Minnesota and the world," says Frank Cerra, senior vice president for health sciences at the University of Minnesota.

"This is a state-of-the-art facility where great medical breakthroughs will happen," says Frank Cerra, senior vice president for health sciences at the University of Minnesota. "The University has always had the research talent, and now we have an innovative place for collaboration to improve the health of the people of Minnesota and the world."

The 95,000 square feet McGuire building is connected to the Lions Research Building, a facility dedicated to vision, hearing, and neuroscience research. The building is named for William and Nadine McGuire in recognition of the $10 million contribution from the William W. and Nadine M. Family Foundation. The remainder of the funding came the College of Pharmacy ($2.2 million) and the State of Minnesota ($24.8 million).

"Nadine and I were advocates for this project because we believe that the University of Minnesota must have the resources to achieve and maintain a world-class medical research and teaching competency, if our nation is to more effectively prevent and treat diseases," says William McGuire, who is chairman and CEO of UnitedHealth Group. "The challenges of fully realizing such a competency are still ahead, but this facility is an important building block in the process."