HUMAN RIGHTS. YES!

PART 4:
LEARNING ABOUT HUMAN RIGHTS


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ANNEXES

 

 

Human Rights Instruments

 

 

The following are the internet addresses for the principal instruments cited in Human Rights. YES!

 

· The African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (African Charter)
http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/instree/z1afchar.htm

· Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT, Torture Convention)
http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/h_cat39.htm

· Convention Concerning Indigenous and Tribal Peoples in Independent Countries (ILO No. 169)

http://www.ohchr.org/english/law/indigenous/htm

· Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW)

http://www.ohchr.org/english/law/cedaw.htm

· International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD)

http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/9.htm

· Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC, Children’s Convention)

http://www.ohchr.org/english/law/crc.htm

· International Convention for the Protection of the Rights of Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families (ICRMW)

http://www.ohchr.org/english/law/cmw.htm

· Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)

http://www.ohchr.org/english/law/disabilities-convention.htm

· Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

http://www.ohchr.org/english/issues/indigenous/docs/draftdeclaration.pdf

· European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (European Convention)

http://conventions.coe.int/Treaty/en/Treaties/Html/005.htm

· ILO Convention 159 (concerning vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (Disabled Persons)

http://www.ilo.org/ilolex/english/convdisp1.htm

· Inter-American Convention on Human Rights (Inter-American Convention)

http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/oasinstr/zoas3con.htm

· International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR)

http://www.ohchr.org/english/law/ccpr.htm

· International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR)

http://www.unhchr.ch/html/menu3/b/a_cescr.htm

· Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)

http://www.unhchr.ch/udhr/

· UN Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities (Standard Rules)

http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/enable/dissre00.htm

 

 

Annex 2:
General Resources

 

Web-based International Human Rights Law Libraries

 

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (International Human Rights Instruments):

http://www.unhchr.ch/html/intlinst.htm

 

University of Minnesota Human Rights Library:

http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts

 

Web-based General Resources on Human Rights and Disability

 

ACT (Advocating Change Together)

(Information on disability rights advocacy particularly for self-advocates with developmental disabilities):

http://www.selfadvocacy.org

 

Disabled Peoples’ International, “Ratification Toolkit”

(On ratification advocacy for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities):

http://www.icrpd.net/ratification/en/index.htm

 

Disabled Peoples’ International, “Implementation Toolkit”

(On implementation advocacy for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities):

http://www.icrpd.net/implementation/en/index.htm

 

Harvard Project on Disability, Harvard Law School

(Information on the range of law, policy and advocacy initiatives of the Project):

http://www.hpod.org/

 

International Disability Alliance

(Coalition of NGOs advancing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities)

http://www.internationaldisabilityalliance.org/en

 

United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

(Website offering info on the UN Program on Disability and disability specific resources):

http://www.un.org/disabilities

 

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

(Webpage for human rights and disability)

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Disability/Pages/DisabilityIndex.aspx

 

World Enable

(Internet accessibility initiative providing information on a range of topics, including the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities):

http://www.worldenable.net

 

 

Annex 3:
A Glossary for Disability and Human Rights

 

Note: Terms in this glossary are found in bold-face type in the text of Human Rights. YES!

 

ADOPTION: Usually refers to the initial diplomatic stage at which the official text of a treaty is accepted (in the case of a UN treaty, by the General Assembly). After adoption, a treaty is typically opened for signature and is usually subject to ratification by individual governments.

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION (also Positive Discrimination, Reverse Discrimination): Action taken by a government or private institution to make up for past discrimination in education, employment, or promotion on the basis of gender, race, ethnic origin, religion, or disability.

AFRICAN CHARTER ON HUMAN AND PEOPLE’S RIGHTS (African Charter): A regional human rights treaty for the African continent adopted by the Organization of African Unity (OAU) (now reconfigured as the African Union) in 1981.

AMERICAN CONVENTION ON HUMAN RIGHTS (American Convention, Pact of San Jose, Costa Rica): A regional human rights treaty adopted by the Organization of American States (OAS) in 1969.

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA): Passed in 1990, this US Federal law provides comprehensive civil rights protections with the aim of achieving full integration in society for persons with disabilities. By far the most forward-thinking disability legislation of its time, the ADA has become a model for legislation in many other countries.

ARTICLE: A numbered section of a legal document such as a treaty or declaration. For example, Article 7 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities addresses children with disabilities.

BASIC PRINCIPLES FOR THE TREATMENT OF PRISONERS: Adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1990, this document sets out standards of good practice for the treatment of prisoners and management of penal institutions. The main emphasis is on the need to safeguard the human rights of prisoners.

BODY OF PRINCIPLES FOR THE PROTECTION OF ALL PERSONS UNDER ANY FORM OF DETENTION OR IMPRISONMENT: Adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1992, this document sets out standards for treatment of people held in any form of detention or imprisonment, whether in a state prison or some other form of detention.

COMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS: The body of independent experts that monitors implementation of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) by its States Parties.

COMMITTEE ON THE RIGHTS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (CRPD Committee): The body of 18 independent experts responsible for monitoring the implementation of the CRPD by States Parties and for reviewing communications and initiating inquiries under the Optional Protocol to the CRPD.

CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS: Document prepared by treaty bodies, such as the CRPD Committee or CERD Committee, in response to its review of a report submitted by a State Party as part of the process of reviewing a State’s implementation of a human rights treaty.

CONFERENCE OF STATES PARTIES TO THE CRPD: Meeting of States Parties to the CRPD in which treaty implementation is discussed and to which non-governmental organizations, including disabled people’s organizations, national human rights institutions, observer States and others are invited.

CRPD SECRETARIAT: Refers to the two offices within the United Nations mandated to provide personnel, policy, research and logistical support to the CRPD Committee and the Conference of States Parties. The CRPD Committee is supported by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the Conference of States Parties is supported by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA).

CONVENTION: Legally binding agreement between states; used synonymously with treaty and covenant. Conventions are stronger than declarations because they are legally binding for governments that have ratified them. When the UN General Assembly adopts a convention, it creates international norms and standards. Once a convention is adopted by the UN General Assembly, member states can then sign and ratify the convention, promising to uphold it.

CONVENTION AGAINST TORTURE AND OTHER CRUEL, INHUMAN OR DEGRADING TREATMENT OR PUNISHMENT (CAT, Torture Convention) (adopted 1984; entered into force 1987): Treaty defining and prohibiting torture and other forms of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

CONVENTION ON THE ELIMINATION OF ALL FORMS OF DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN (CEDAW, Women’s Convention) (adopted 1979; entered into force 1981): The first legally binding international document prohibiting discrimination against women and obligating governments to take affirmative action to advance the equality of women.

CONVENTION ON THE RIGHTS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (CRPD) (adopted 2006; entered into force 2008): Treaty defining the rights of persons with disabilities within the context of international human rights law and covering civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights; first international treaty on disability rights.

CONVENTION ON THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD (CRC, Children’s Convention) (adopted 1989; entered into force 1990): Treaty setting forth a full spectrum of civil, cultural, economic, social, and political rights for children.

COVENANT: Binding agreement between states; used synonymously with convention and treaty. The major international human rights covenants, both adopted by the General Assembly in 1966, are the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR).

DECLARATION: Document stating agreed-upon standards but which is not legally binding. UN conferences (e.g., the1993 UN Conference on Human Rights in Vienna, the 1995 World Conference for Women in Beijing) usually produce two sets of declarations: an official document written by government representatives and an unofficial document written by non-governmental organizations (NGOs). The UN General Assembly often issues influential but legally non-binding declarations. Such documents may, however, contribute to the development of customary international law.

DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS OF PERSONS BELONGING TO NATIONAL, OR ETHNIC, RELIGIOUS AND LINGUISTIC MINORITIES (adopted 1992): Instrument that recognizes and protects the existence and the national or ethnic, cultural, religious and linguistic identity of minorities.

DE FACTO EQUALITY: Equality that exists in practice and people’s lived experience as well as in law. De facto equality is achieved only when discrimination is effectively abolished and people enjoy their rights on an equal basis with others.

DISABLED PEOPLE’S ORGANIZATION (DPO): Non-governmental organization led by and for persons with disabilities.

ENTRY INTO FORCE: The process through which a treaty becomes fully binding on the states that have ratified it. This happens when the minimum number of ratifications called for by the treaty has been achieved.

EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY: Equality based on people’s ability to be included and enjoy opportunities on the same basis as all other people.

EUROPEAN CONVENTION FOR THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND FUNDAMENTAL FREEDOMS (European Convention, European Convention on Human Rights, ECHR): A regional human rights treaty adopted in 1950 by the Council of Europe. All Council of Europe member states are party to the ECHR, and new members are expected to ratify the convention at the earliest opportunity.

FORMAL EQUALITY: Concept of equality that people who are alike should be treated equally and judged on their actual characteristics. Formal equality in employment, for example, would demand that applicants for a job be evaluated on their relevant experience, background, and skills, and that the selection process neither favour nor disfavour anyone based on other factors, such as race, social standing, family connections or other non-relevant matters. Formal equality does not take into account that persons are not necessarily similarly situated and thus additional measures (such as positive discrimination) may be required in order to advance substantive equality.

FULFIL HUMAN RIGHTS: The obligation to “fulfil” human rights means that States must take positive action to ensure that everyone, including persons with disabilities can exercise their human rights. They must adopt laws and policies that promote human rights. They must develop programmes and take other measures to implement these rights. They must allocate the necessary resources to enforce laws and fund programmatic efforts.

GENERAL COMMENT: Document adopted by a treaty body that sets forth the committee’s understanding of a particular treaty provision or a particular issue covered by the treaty or its methods of work. General comments often seek to clarify the reporting duties of State parties with respect to certain provisions and suggest approaches to implementation of treaty provisions. Also called “general recommendation” by some treaty bodies.

HABILITATION: Effective and appropriate measures aimed to help people attain and maintain maximum independence and full inclusion and participation in all aspects of life and for the benefit of people who are born with a disability or acquire a disability at an early age, to empower them to reach their full potential as they learn and grow. By contrast, rehabilitation refers to re-gaining and maintaining maximum independence and full inclusion after acquiring a disability or a change in one’s disability.

HUMAN RIGHTS COMMITTEE: The treaty body of independent experts that monitors implementation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights by state parties.

HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL: Created at the 2005 World Summit to replace the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, the Council is a political organ mandated to investigate violations of human rights. The Human Rights Council is a subsidiary body of the General Assembly and reports directly to it.

HUMAN RIGHTS FRAMEWORK: Refers to the corpus of legally, politically, and morally binding set of principles for governments as set forth in international human rights instruments.

INALIENABLE: Refers to the principle that human rights belong to every person and cannot be taken from a person under any circumstances. Human rights automatically belong to each human being. They are not given to people by their government or any other authority, nor can they be taken away.

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: The education of all children, youth and adults - with and without disabilities - in the general education system with appropriate accommodations and support. Inclusion involves having access to education with appropriate networks of support and changing the policies, practices, and attitudes within the school system to remove barriers for students with disabilities.

INDEPENDENT LIVING MOVEMENT: Social movement of persons with disabilities that emerged in the United States, Europe and elsewhere, beginning in the 1970s, that is based on the premise that persons with disabilities should have the choice of living in the community with the appropriate supports. This can be accomplished through the creation of personal assistance services allowing an individual to manage his or her personal care, to keep a home, to have a job, go to school, worship, and otherwise participate in the life of the community.

INDIVIDUAL COMMUNICATIONS PROCEDURE: A dispute settlement procedure familiar in human rights systems allowing an individual or group to lodge a complaint to a treaty body (or other procedure) that alleges human rights violations. Such procedures result in non-binding recommendations in cases of violation.

INDIVISIBLE: Refers to the principle that each human right is of equal importance. A person cannot be denied a right because someone decides it is “less important” or “nonessential.”

INFORMED CONSENT: Refers to the process by which a person is provided with the information necessary to fully participate in decisions about his or her health care and also the process required in order for medical research and experimentation to be deemed lawful. Based on a patient’s right to direct what happens to his or her body and the ethical duty of the physician/researcher to involve the patient in decision-making. The right to informed consent is recognized in Article 25 of the CRPD, Health.

INHERENT: Principle that human rights are a natural part of who you are. The text of Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) begins: “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.”

INSTRUMENT: A formal, written, official document, such as a treaty or declaration, in which a State expresses its intention to uphold certain human rights principles or norms. May be legally binding or non-binding. May be global, regional, or national.

INTEGRATED EDUCATION: Placing children with disabilities in the general education system with the expectation that they adapt or “fit in” to the existing system and culture and without providing necessary supports and removing barriers to their learning; differs from inclusive education, which supplies these supports and accommodations.

INTER-AMERICAN CONVENTION ON THE ELIMINATION OF ALL FORMS OF DISCRIMINATION AGAINST PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: Treaty adopted by the Organization of American States (OAS) in 1999; first regional treaty specifically addressing disability rights.

INTERDEPENDENT: Refers to the complementary and interrelated framework of human rights law. For example, your ability to participate in your government is directly affected by your right to express yourself, to get an education, and even to obtain the necessities of life.

INTERGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS (IGOs): Organizations sponsored by several governments that seek to coordinate their efforts; some are regional (e.g., the Council of Europe, the Organization of American States), some are alliances (e.g., the North Atlantic Treaty Organization); and some are dedicated to a specific purpose (e.g., the World Health Organization, International Labour Organization).

INTERNATIONAL BILL OF HUMAN RIGHTS: The combination of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR).

INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION ON THE ELIMINATION OF ALL FORMS OF RACIAL DISCRIMINATION (CERD, Race Convention) (adopted 1965; entered into force 1969): Treaty defining and prohibiting racial discrimination.

INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION ON THE PROTECTION OF THE RIGHTS OF ALL MIGRANT WORKERS AND MEMBERS OF THEIR FAMILIES (ICRMW) (adopted 1990; entered into force 1998): Treaty defining the rights of migrant workers and their families.

INTERNATIONAL COVENANT ON CIVIL AND POLITICAL RIGHTS (ICCPR) (adopted 1966; entered into force 1976): The ICCPR declares that all people have a broad range of civil and political rights. One of the core documents comprising the International Bill of Human Rights.

INTERNATIONAL COVENANT ON ECONOMIC, SOCIAL, AND CULTURAL RIGHTS (ICESCR) (Adopted 1966; entered into force 1976): The ICESCR declares that all people have a broad range of economic, social, and cultural rights. One of the core documents comprising the International Bill of Human Rights.

INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW: Part of international law that applies in times of armed conflict; creates protected status for certain persons including civilians, help for victims, and limits to methods of warfare to minimize destruction, loss of life and unnecessary human suffering. Includes the Geneva Conventions of 1949, among other treaties.

INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANIZATION (ILO): An intergovernmental organization established in 1919 as part of the Versailles Peace Treaty to improve working conditions and promote social justice; the ILO became a Specialized Agency of the UN in 1946.

INTERRELATED: Refers to the concept that human rights are complementary and affect each other.

INQUIRY PROCEDURE: A procedure allowing a treaty body to initiate an inquiry into grave or systemic human rights treaty violations. Such procedures result in non-binding findings and/or recommendations.

LEGAL CAPACITY: Concept recognizing someone as a person before the law, ensuring that people are legally considered persons and not just objects or the property of others; and including the capacity to act, ensuring that people are able to exercise their legal capacity, for example regarding financial matters.

MEDICAL MODEL OF DISABILITY: Understanding of disability as a narrow, medical problem that needs to be “fixed” or an illness that needs to be “cured.” This perspective implies that a person with a disability is somehow “broken” or “sick” and requires fixing or healing. The CRPD has created a paradigm shift away from the medical model in favour of the social model of disability.

NON-BINDING: A document, like a declaration, that carries no formal legal obligations. It may, however, carry moral obligations or, over time, attain the force of law as customary international law.

NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION (NGO): An organization formed by people outside of government. NGOs monitor the proceedings of human rights bodies such as the Human Rights Committee. Some are large and international (e.g., the Red Cross/Crescent, Amnesty International); others may be small and local (e.g., an organization to advocate for people with a particular kind of disability in a particular city). NGOs play a major role in influencing UN policy; many of them have official consultative status at the UN.

OFFICE OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS (OHCHR): An office of the United Nations Secretariat mandated to promote and protect all rights established in international human rights laws and treaties. Located in Geneva, the OHCHR works to prevent human rights violations, secure respect for all human rights, promote international cooperation to protect human rights, and coordinate related activities throughout the United Nations.

OPTIONAL PROTOCOL: Separate treaty that provides States Parties to the parent treaty with the opportunity to participate or “opt in” with regard to procedures set forth in the optional protocol or additional obligations not found in the parent treaty.

POSITIVE DISCRIMINATION: See affirmative action.

PROGRESSIVE REALIZATION: Doctrine that recognizes that States have different economic capacities, that full enjoyment of human rights cannot occur over night and the implementations of economic, social and cultural rights may take time to achieve. The doctrine allows States to take steps to the maximum extent possible with regard to their available resources but it does not mean that immediate steps toward implementation can be delayed.

PROTECT: The obligation to “protect” human rights means that the State is required to protect everyone, including persons with disabilities, against abuses by non-State actors, such as individuals, businesses, institutions, or other private organizations.

RATIFICATION, RATIFY: Process by which the legislative body of a state confirms a government’s action in signing a treaty; formal procedure by which a state becomes bound to a treaty after acceptance.

REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION: Necessary and appropriate modifications or adjustment to a practice, program, or physical environment so that it is accessible, appropriate, and usable for a person with disabilities on an equal basis with others. Under the CRPD, the failure to provide reasonable accommodation constitutes discrimination. In addition, such modifications should be reasonable and not involve undue hardship.

REHABILITATION: Effective and appropriate measures aimed at helping people attain and maintain maximum independence; full physical, mental, social, and vocational ability; and full inclusion and participation in all aspects of life as a result of acquiring a disability or a change in one’s disability or circumstances. By contrast, habilitation refers to helping people who are born with a disability or acquire one at an early age attain and maintain maximum independence and full inclusion.

RESPECT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS: The obligation to “respect” human rights means that States must not interfere with the exercise and enjoyment of the rights of persons with disabilities. They must refrain from any action that violates human rights. They must also eliminate laws, policies, and practices that are contrary to human rights.

REVERSE DISCRIMINATION: See affirmative action.

SHADOW REPORT: Advocacy method undertaken by human rights organizations to supplement or present alternative information to the periodic government reports that State Parties are required to submit to treaty bodies under the core human rights conventions.

SOCIAL MODEL OF DISABILITY: Understanding of disability that focuses on eliminating the barriers created by the social and physical environment and that inhibit the ability of persons with disabilities to exercise their human rights. This perspective is reflected in the CRPD.

SPECIAL PROCEDURES: General name given to the mechanisms established by the Human Rights Council to address either specific country situations or thematic issues in all parts of the world. The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights provides these mechanisms with personnel, policy, research, and logistical support for the discharge of their mandates.

SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR: Title given to individual experts working on behalf of the United Nations generally, though not exclusively, within the scope of its Special Procedures who bear a specific mandate from the United Nations Human Rights Council. In 1993 the Standard Rules established a Special Rapporteur on Disability, who reports annually on the implementation of the Standard Rules and whose mandate is subject to periodic renewal.

SIGNING, SIGN: In human rights the first step in ratification of a treaty; to sign a Convention, or one of the Covenants constitutes a promise to refrain from undermining the principles in the document and to honour its spirit.

STANDARD RULES: See UN Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities.

STATE: Often synonymous with “country” or “nation state”; a group of people permanently occupying a fixed territory having common laws and government and capable of conducting international affairs.

STATE PARTY (plural States Parties): Those countries that have ratified a Covenant or a Convention and are thereby bound to conform to its provisions.

TREATY: Formal agreement between state that defines and modifies their mutual duties and obligations; used synonymously with Convention and Covenant. By signing a treaty, a country is making a commitment to follow the principles in the treaty and to begin the ratification process, but the treaty is not legally binding on a country until it is ratified.

TREATY BODY: Committee composed of independent experts responsible for monitoring compliance with human rights treaty obligations, such as the CRPD Committee.

UNITED NATIONS CHARTER: Initial document of the UN setting forth its goals, functions, and responsibilities; adopted in San Francisco in 1945.

UN STANDARD RULES ON THE EQUALIZATION OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (STANDARD RULES): Adopted by the General Assembly in 1993, this non-binding instrument represents a strong moral and political commitment of governments to take action to attain equalization of opportunities for persons with disabilities. Its 22 rules cover all aspects of life for persons with disabilities and serve as a basis for policy-making and technical and economic cooperation.

UNIVERSAL: Human rights apply to every person in the world, regardless of their race, colour, sex, ethnic or social origin, religion, language, nationality, age, sexual orientation, disability, or other status. They apply equally and without discrimination to each and every person. The only requirement for having human rights is to be human.

UNIVERSAL PERIODIC REVIEW (UPR): Unique process of review created in 2006 which involves a review of the human rights records of all 192 UN Member States once every four years. The UPR is a State-driven process, under the auspices of the Human Rights Council, which provides the opportunity for each State to declare what actions they have taken to improve the human rights situations in their countries and to fulfil their human rights obligations.

UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS (UDHR) (Adopted by the UN General Assembly on December 10, 1948): Primary UN document establishing human rights standards and norms. All UN Member States have agreed to uphold the UDHR. Although the UDHR was intended to be non-binding, through time its various provisions have become so respected by states that it can now be said to be customary international law. One of the core documents comprising the International Bill of Rights.

UNIVERSAL DESIGN: the design of products, environments, programmes, and services to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. A curb cut, for example, serves many people (parents with strollers, people with rolling luggage, wheelchair users, persons who are blind, cyclists, and many others).

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO): an intergovernmental organization under the auspices of the United Nations that works to promote health worldwide.

 

 

Annex 4: Topic Index

 

Abuse:

· Chapter 6, Torture and Abuse

· In prison setting: Chapter 6, Freedom from Torture/Abuse

· Of children: Chapter 6, Freedom from Torture/Abuse

· Of women: Chapter 16, Women

 

Accessibility:

· Chapter 2, Accessibility

· Attitudinal: Chapter 2, Accessibility

· Informational: Chapter 2, Accessibility; Chapter 3, Expression and Opinion

· Institutional: Chapter 2, Accessibility; Chapter 3, Expression and Opinion

· Physical: Chapter 2, Accessibility

· To courts and legal services: Chapter 12, Access to Justice

· To healthcare: Chapter 8, Health; Chapter 16, Women

· To justice system: Chapter 12, Access to Justice

· To public services: Chapter 3, Participation in Political and Public Life

· To rehabilitation services: Chapter 16, Women

· To sports and cultural events: Chapter 14, Sport and Culture

· To voting: Chapter 3, Participation in Political and Public Life

 

Advocacy:

· Part 1, Understanding the Human Rights of Persons with Disabilities

· Commitment to: Part 4, Facilitating Human Rights Learning, Section 1

· Learning Exercises on: Part 4, Facilitating Human Rights Learning, Section 4

· Planning: Part 3, Advocacy! Taking Action for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Section 1.

Children:

· Chapter 15, The Human Rights of Children with Disabilities

· Children: Chapter 15, Children

· Abuse of: Chapter 7, Privacy, Integrity, Home, and the Family; Chapter 6, Torture and Abuse

· In crisis situations: Chapter 5, Right to Life

· In institutions: Chapter 6, Torture and Abuse

· Parents and families of: Chapter 15, Children

· Personal integrity: Chapter 7, Privacy, Integrity, Home, and the Family

· Right to education: Chapter 13, Education; Chapter 15, Children

· Right to expression: Chapter 4, Freedom of Expression and Opinion

· Right to participation: Chapter 15, Children

· Right to play: Chapter 14, Sport and Culture

 

Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD):

· CRPD Committee: Part 3, Advocacy! Taking Action for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Section 2.

· Monitoring: Part 1, Understanding the Human Rights of Persons with Disabilities; Part 3, Advocacy! Taking Action for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Section 2

· Optional Protocol to: Part 3, Advocacy! Taking Action for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Section 2.

· Periodic reporting: Part 3, Advocacy! Taking Action for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Section 2.

Cultural and Linguistic Identity:

· Chapter 14, Sport and Culture

Decision Making:

· In healthcare: Chapter 8, Health

· Supported decision making: Chapter 11, Independence and Dignity

· In development decision: Chapter 18, Other Populations

 

Definition of disability:

· Part 1, Understanding the Human Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Development Discrimination:

· Chapter 17, Other Populations

· In health care: Chapter 8, Health

· Multiple discriminations: Part 1, Human Rights; Chapter 17, Other Populations

 

Education:

· Chapter 13, Education

· Children's right to: Chapter 15, Children

· Inclusive: Chapter 13, Education

· Integrated: Chapter 13, Education

· Qualified teachers: Chapter 13, Education

· Quality education: Chapter 13, Education

· Right to: Chapter 13, Education

· Women's right to: Chapter 16, Women

 

Emergencies and Natural Disasters:

· Chapter 5, Right to Life and Protection in Situations of Risk Equality:

· De facto equality: Chapter 1, Equality and Non-discrimination

· Equality of opportunity: Chapter 1, Equality and Non-discrimination

· Formal equality: Chapter 1, Equality and Non-discrimination

· In healthcare: Chapter 8, Health

· Women in: Chapter 16, Women

 

Eugenics:

· Chapter 5, Right to Life

Euthanasia:

· Chapter 5, Right to Life

Exploitation:

· Chapter 6, Torture and Abuse Family

· Decision making in: Chapter 16, Women

· Right to: Chapter 7, Privacy, Integrity, Home, and the Family

· Rights to live with: Chapter 7, Privacy, Integrity, Home, and the Family

· Rights to marry: Chapter 7, Privacy, Integrity, Home, and the Family; Chapter 16, Women

 

Gender Discrimination:

· Chapter 16, Women

Health Care:

· Chapter 8, Health

· Abuse of: Chapter 7, Privacy, Integrity, Home, and the Family; Chapter 6, Torture and Abuse

· Advanced health care directives: Chapter 8, Health

· Armed conflict: Part 1, Human Rights; Chapter 5, Right to Life

· Assisted suicide: Chapter 5, Right to Life

· Children: Chapter 15, Children

· Decision making: Chapter 8, Health

· Habilitation/rehabilitation: Chapter 8, Health

· In institutions: Chapter 6, Torture and Abuse

· Parents and families of: Chapter 15, Children

· Personal integrity: Chapter 7, Privacy, Integrity, Home, and the Family

· Reproductive: Chapter 16, Women

· Right to education: Chapter 13, Education; Chapter 15, Children

· Right to participation: Chapter 15, Children

· Right to play: Chapter 14, Sport and Culture

Habilitation/Rehabilitation:

· Chapter 9, Habilitation/Rehabilitation

· Women's access to: Chapter 16, Women

 

HIV-AIDS: Chapter 8, Health; Chapter 17, Other Populations

 

Human Rights Education:

· Part 4, Facilitating Human Rights Learning,

Humanitarian Emergencies:

· Chapter 5, The Right to Life and Protection in Situations Of Risk

Independent Living:

· Chapter 11, Independence and Dignity

· Independent Living Movement: Chapter 9, Habilitation/Rehabilitation; Chapter 11, Independence and Dignity; Chapter 16, Women

· Right to: Chapter 11, Independence and Dignity

 

Indigenous Peoples:

· Chapter 17, Other Populations

Informed Consent:

· In plain language: Chapter 4, Freedom of Expression and Opinion

· Privacy of: Chapter 7, Privacy, Integrity, Home, and the Family

· To Internet: Chapter 4, Freedom of Expression and Opinion

· Chapter 8, Health

 

Institutional Living:

· Children in: Chapter 6, Freedom from Torture/Abuse

· Dangers to life: Chapter 5, Right to Life

· Independent living: Chapter 11, Independence and Dignity

· Violence in: Chapter 6, Freedom from Torture/Abuse

Internet:

· Access to: Chapter 2, Accessibility; Chapter 3, Participation in Political and Public Life; Chapter 4, Freedom of Expression and Opinion.

 

Legal Capacity:

· To marry, Chapter 7, Privacy, Integrity, Home, and the Family

· Women's right to Chapter 16, Women

· To live independently, Chapter 11, Independence and Dignity

 

Myths and Stereotypes:

· Of children: Part 1, Chapter 15, Children

· In decision making: Part 1, Chapter 11, Independence and Dignity; Chapter 17, Other Populations

· In designing programmes: Part 1, Chapter 9, Habilitation/Rehabilitation; Chapter 16, Women

· In elections: Part 1, Chapter 3, Participation in Political and Public Life

· In healthcare decisions: Part 1, Chapter 8, Health

· In organizations: Part 1, Chapter 3, Participation in Political and Public Life

· In political and public life: Part 1, Chapter 3, Participation in Political and Public Life

 

Peer Counselling:

· Chapter 9, Habilitation/Rehabilitation

Person-first Language:

· Part 1, Understanding the Human Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Personal Assistants:

· Chapter 7, Privacy

Physician Assisted Suicide:

· Chapter 5, Right to Life

Poverty:

· Chapter 17, Other Population

Prison:

· Chapter 6, Freedom from Torture/Abuse

Psychosocial disabilities:

· Abuse of people with: Part 1, Chapter 6, Freedom from Torture/Abuse

· Habilitation and rehabilitation: Part 1, Chapter 8, Health

 

Reasonable accommodation:

· and accessibility: Part 2, Chapter 2, Accessibility

· and equality: Part 2, Chapter 2, Equality and Non-discrimination

· compared to habilitation: Part 2, Chapter 9, Habilitation/Rehabilitation

· defined: Part 1, Understanding the Human Rights of Persons with Disabilities

· essential to equality: Part 2, Chapter 1, Equality and Non-discrimination

· in education: Part 2, Chapter 13, Education

 

Refugees:

· Chapter 17, The Human Rights of Other Populations of Persons with Disabilities

 

Rehabilitation:

· Chapter 9, Habilitation/Rehabilitation and health: Chapter 8, Health

Sexuality:

· Reproductive health care: Chapter 16, Women

· Sexual violence and abuse: Chapter 6, Torture and Abuse; Chapter 16, Women

· Sexual privacy: Chapter 7, Privacy

 

Supported Decision-making:

· Chapter 11, Living Independently and with Dignity in the Community

 

Sport:

· Chapter 14, Cultural Life/Sport

 

Torture:

· Chapter 6, Freedom from Torture and Other Forms of Abuse

Transportation/Travel:

· Chapter 14, Cultural Life/Sport

· Security checks: Chapter 7, Privacy

· Tourism: Chapter 14, Cultural Life/Sport

 

Universal Design:

· And accessibility: Chapter 2, Accessibility

· For learning: Chapter 13, Education

· In healthcare: Chapter 8, Health

 

Violence:

· Chapter 6, Freedom from Torture and Other Forms of Abuse

· Against children: Chapter 7, Privacy, Integrity, Home, and the Family

· Chapter 15, Children; Chapter 16, Women

· Against women: Chapter 16, Women

· From caregivers: Chapter 16, Women

· In situations of risk: Chapter 5, The Right to Life

 

Women with Disabilities:

· Chapter 16, Women

· As activists: Chapter 16, Women

 

Work:

· Chapter 10, Right to Work

· Awareness raising: Chapter 10, Right to Work

· Discrimination against women: Chapter 16, Women

 

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