University of Minnesota



Center for Genocide and Holocaust Studies
University of Minnesota
Nolte Hall


What are the basic goals of the organization?


The primary goal of this organization is education: daily education of the general public and research to create knowledge, understanding and prevention of future genocides. 


Although the goal is to prevent future genocides, what does the center do about new human rights violations and genocides?  How do we educate?


The Center is not based on the idea of STOPPING genocide, but creating a knowledge base to get people involved and sensitive about the subject of genocide, in an academic and dialogical sense. 


The Center is committed to creating also a mandate in Holocaust studies for K-12 education, because creating constant awareness of the Holocaust (and genocide) within all individuals is paramount to preventing it. 


And through a Public Relations and Education angle: The Center is attempting to “leach” into other subjects, especially those that might not be outwardly considered genocide, as well as keeping local issues at a forefront as well (domestic issues remaining public and discussed).  By notifying the public and educating the public on issues that might not be covered in depth or explained by American media, the Center creates and maintains awareness.


Does the organization have a long-term goal(s)? 


Choosing carefully the committees with whom the CHGS works with. 


CHGS desires a permanent course in the Holocaust at the University of Minnesota.  The purpose of this is to teach about it to prevent, or at the very least create an early-warning system for genocide.  Then eventually, the introduction of other courses, including courses on representation and summer courses on genocide.  There is a course on the genocide in Yugoslavia, women in the Holocaust, and post-Holocaust Jewish and Christian Theology. 


There is currently no minor or major in Holocaust and Genocide Studies.  It’s a very tight field and students may not have a clear goal with what to do with the learning.  A concentration is a better goal with this kind of study, as a degree would lead largely into an education career rather than the direct application of human rights.  The best way to pursue Genocide Studies as a career (and especially with the CHGS) is to obtain a degree in law. 


Describe a “day in the life” of the organization?  What basically is accomplished by employees and volunteers on a daily basis?


For any employees with the Center, daily life includes a lot of education: formal education in the classroom as well as speaking events and visits to schools, organizations, and education centers.  All of the employees at the Center educate in one way or another.

A good amount of research is included in a daily basis to update the website and serve a resource.

Event planning—there are usually a number of ongoing events that the organization is sponsoring or co-sponsoring.


Who does this organization employ? (i.e. Graduate degrees; only grant writing background, etc).  Why?


The Center is looking for people who KNOW the subject.  Educational background in the Holocaust or genocide studies is a definite must, and degrees or practical experience in research and education are helpful.  A Center employee must have people skills, and good background in networking, a background in event coordination, and a knowledge of the political and legislative process. 


At the very least an undergraduate degree is necessary, but master’s degrees are helpful.  The current Outreach Coordinator has a master’s degree, came to the Center with an extensive local network and a background in sociology and event coordinating. 


A background is also necessary in event coordinating. 


Where does this organization advertise when there are job openings?


Within the university through the Human Resources protocol.  With academic positions, such as professorships, the University might invite people to apply. 



Staff resumes provided? YES




1.  Does this organization take volunteersYes, largely during the academic year.


What are the expectations/minimum requirements for volunteers in this organization?

Volunteers have specific duties, mostly in education: as speakers or organizers for projects such as art and museum exhibits, and it is by case.  Volunteering would require an informational phone call or email to find if there are opportunities. 



2.  Does this organization take interns Yes, but again only during the school year. 


What are the expectations/minimum requirements to obtain an internship with this organization? 

An intern with this organization would need to want to speak about genocide, as well as participate in typical research and administrative work. 


3.  Are there employment opportunities at this organization? 


What are the basic requirements for this organization for any employee hired to address human rights?

Other than the basic requirements stated above, which include strong educational background, a desire to educate and the ability to plan events and conduct research.  A prior relationship with the Center is always helpful as well.



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