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CENTER for
VIOLENCE
PREVENTION and
CONTROL


School of Public Health
University of Minnesota




E-mail:
gerbe001@umn.edu

Phone:
(612) 624-1449

Fax:
(612) 626-0650

Division of Environmental Health Sciences
School of Public Health
University of Minnesota
Box 807 Mayo
420 Delaware Street SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455



 

A Guide to Courses that Include Content Pertinent to Violence Prevention and Control

Introduction
Course Symbols
Departments offering Courses

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Support for this project was provided by the University of Minnesota Interdisciplinary Research and Postbaccalaureate Education Program, Graduate School, University of Minnesota (U of MN), Minneapolis, Minnesota and the Allina Foundation, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The Center for Violence Prevention and Control is most grateful to Nancy Nachreiner, Ph.D. student, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, for her significant contributions to the compilation of the course directory information.


Reviews and other contributions by Center Participants were also essential to this effort. These participants are as follows:
  • Nina Bacaner, M.D., M.P.H., Community-University Health Care Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Beverly Balos, J.D., Clinical Professor of Law, Law School, U of MN
  • Lori Bock, Coordinator, Consortium Electronic Clearinghouse, Children, Youth, and Family Consortium, U of MN
  • Kathy Botelle, Community-University Health Care Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Mary Braddock, M.D., M.P.H., Co-Director, Violence Prevention Research Initiative, U of MN, and Medical Director of Community Health and Preventive Health Care, Children's Health Care, St. Paul, Minnesota
  • Janny Brust, M.P.H., Epidemiologist, Allina Foundation, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Jeffrey L. Edleson, Ph.D., Professor, School of Social Work, U of MN, and Co-Chair, Minnesota Higher Education Center Against Violence and Abuse
  • Ed Ehlinger, M.D., Director, Boynton Health Services, U of MN
  • Mary Louise Fellows, J.D., Everett Frasier Professor of Law, Law School, U of MN
  • Patricia A. Frazier, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, U of MN
  • Susan Goodwin Gerberich, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Director, Regional Injury Prevention Research Center and Center for Violence Prevention and Control, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, U of MN
  • Jane Gilgun, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Social Work, U of MN
  • Joan Gudorf, M.S.W., Medical Social Worker, Community-University Health Care Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Susan Hadley, Director of WomanKind, Fairview Health System, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Wendy Hellerstedt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Maternal and Child Health Program, Division of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, U of MN
  • Rhonda Jones-Webb, Ph. D., Assistant Professor, Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, U of MN
  • LaVohn E. Josten, Ph.D., R.N., Associate Professor, School of Nursing, U of MN
  • Laura K. Kochevar, Ph.D., Educational Specialist, Regional Injury Prevention Research Center and Center for Violence Prevention and Control, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, U of MN
  • Barbara J. Leonard, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Nursing, U of MN
  • James W. Maddock, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Family Social Science-College of Human Ecology, U of MN
  • Geoffrey M. Maruyama, Ph.D., Director, Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement, Professor, Department of Educational Psychology, U of MN
  • Ann S. Masten, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Associate Director, Institute of Child Development, U of MN
  • Patricia McGovern, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Co-Director Center for Violence Prevention and Control, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, U of MN
  • Marie Nguyen Welch, Community-University Health Care Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Demetra Pappas, J.D., Research Fellow, Center for Biomedical Ethics, U of MN
  • Pat Seppanen, Ph.D., Senior Research Associate, National Center on Educational Outcomes, School of Psychology, U of MN
  • Deborah Wingert, Ph.D., Coordinator, Center for Violence Prevention and Control, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, U of MN


INTRODUCTION

Violence has been identified as the intentional use of physical force against another person or against oneself, which either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury or death. However, in addition to physical consequences, emotional consequences are also integral to the spectrum of violence that ranges from harassment to death; these consequences arise from inequities in power in family and other interpersonal relationships, as well as in the workplace and various social settings.

Identified as the number one public health problem in the United States (U.S.), violence has intensified to epidemic proportions. Approximately 6,000 persons in the U.S. incur physical injuries and 65 die each day from some form of interpersonal violence. In 1988, an estimated 1,016 to 2,026 children died from abuse and neglect. Homicide, accounting for over 20,000 deaths each year, is the second leading cause of death for ages 15-34 and is the leading cause of death for young African-American males. Non-fatal assaults account for a higher risk among those 12-24 years of age than those in any other age group. Furthermore, although males have the highest rate of workplace-related homicide, it is the leading cause of death for women in the workplace, accounting for 41 percent of all occupational deaths among women during the 1980's. As is shown in these statistics, violence is multi-faceted and very complex.

Violence has been clearly identified as a major problem not only at the national level, but also one that has had a compelling effect in Minnesota. The overall objective of the Center for Violence Prevention and Control at the University of Minnesota is to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration in research and graduate education efforts that can ultimately affect the prevention and control of violence. To accomplish this, a cadre of faculty members, representing multiple disciplines and colleges have joined in a collaborative Center effort to develop enhanced opportunities for graduate education in violence prevention and control.

A major collaborative effort among multiple disciplines is essential to affect the pervasive public health problem of violence. There are a variety of relevant programs and initiatives, and persons with essential expertise throughout the University and state-wide community that can contribute to a focused endeavor to control violence. This includes individuals from various disciplines such as public health, epidemiology, law, psychology, sociology, social work, public policy, and human ecology.

The information assembled in this directory is provided as a resource for students and advisors in facilitating designs of relevant study plans. Although extensive efforts have been made to identify pertinent courses, it is recognized that some may have been missed inadvertently. The following courses were identified in the University of Minnesota's Graduate School Bulletin for 1994-1996, Continuing Education and Extension University College Bulletin for 1995-1996, Medical School Bulletin for 1995-1997, Law School Course Catalogue for Spring 95-96, Law School Course and Seminar Summaries 1996-1997 listings, or the Minnesota Higher Education Coordinating Board Inventory of Post Secondary Courses on Violence and Abuse. These courses include some focus on violence; the degree of this focus varies greatly among courses. Students should check with their advisors and instructors prior to enrollment.



COURSE SYMBOLS

The following symbols are used throughout the course descriptions in lieu of page footnotes:


 

* (Asterisk)

Course identified in the Minnesota Higher Education Coordinating Board Inventory of Post-Secondary Courses on Violence and Abuse.


, (Comma)

A comma between course numbers (e.g., 8234, 8235, 8236) indicates a series of courses that may be entered any quarter. In prerequisite listings, a comma means "and" (e.g., "prereq 5101, 5102, or 5103" means the prerequisites are 5101 and either 5102 or 5103).


# (Number Symbol)

Approval of the instructor is required for registration.


f, w, s, su (Season Abbreviations)

Fall, winter, spring, summer (follows the course number). Use as a guide only; contact the department offering the course for updates.


- (Hyphen)

A hyphen between course numbers (e.g., 5142-5143-5144) indicates a sequence of courses that must be taken in the order listed.

 



DEPARTMENTS OFFERING COURSES


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